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Submitted by Morgan McGuire, posted on October 26, 2000




Image Description, by Morgan McGuire



This is a screen shot of our 10/20/00 release, Radon 2000. The astute flipCode crowd will probably wonder, "why is he showing us a Tetris clone?". It is actually a re-release of a 1994 windows game that Laura Wollstadt & I wrote for Windows 3.11. At the time, it was hot stuff, and has been a consistent seller for Morgan Systems. The reason we're re-releasing is that it is a demo of our all new on-line credit card processing system and distribution method. And it's a pretty fun Tetris variant. You can choose different block shapes (including ones that change their shape).

You won't believe how much work it is to create a distribution method. It turns out that the difference between writing a really hot piece of software and having a product (i.e. something professional that makes money) is pretty big. You need to have a distribution channel, quality assurance (make sure it runs on all kinds of machines), legal protection, credit card processing, fraud protection, instructions, promotion, customer support, and a web site. Most of this is tricky... and boring. The difference between having a "completed" game and a product is kind of like the difference between a game engine and a game-- you're running at 100fps, it looks beautiful, but you still haven't got something anyone will actually enjoy playing. Except here, you've got something great to play, but can't actually finish/sell it.

I tried to use 3rd party credit card processing, sign with a big time distributor, and distribute shareware/freeware. Finally I gave up and made my own distribution company. I saw some posts on a previous IOTD that others were similarly frustrated. If anyone wants to use our existing distribution infrastructure to handle the legal, credit card, testing, etc. send me an e-mail. I figure that others might have good games (you'd better be making more interesting things than Tetris!), but don't want to deal with all of the business side of things, so I'd be happy to distribute for some fellow flipCoders if there is interest.

Credit for Radon to: Laura Wollstadt, Alison Veneto & Justin Miller.

-Morgan
matrix@alum.mit.edu
Morgan Systems/Origent


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Archive Notice: This thread is old and no longer active. It is here for reference purposes. This thread was created on an older version of the flipcode forums, before the site closed in 2005. Please keep that in mind as you view this thread, as many of the topics and opinions may be outdated.
 
Kurt Miller

October 26, 2000, 05:00 PM

That giant plus-shaped block consistently ruins my progress everytime I play! :p

 
Bagheera

October 26, 2000, 05:51 PM

The boss key crashed my computer.

PIII 1GHz 512MB ram
Windows2000, Matrox G400 Dual Head
Soundblaster Live!
Norton Anti-Virus 2000

I figure that's all the pertinent info

 
Richard D Shank

October 26, 2000, 07:20 PM

bit64

It was Charles Simonyi who came up with the "Hungarian Notation" and Charles was from Hungary. BYW, his original paper is available somewhere on the microsoft site. (I don't remember where right now)

 
Mark Friedenbach

October 26, 2000, 07:50 PM

I was a bit worried that I'd get slammed for writing a *gasp* 2D game.

Nah, most of the stuff here is 3d, but we all still love 2D games/engines. (hey, if 2D works for Blizzard N. (Diablo II), it works for us!)

Don't be afraid! We won't bite! :)

 
Kijiki

October 26, 2000, 10:59 PM

Chaos: the page you linked to is not https, but the CGI script that it sends your CC info to is. View source and you can see that. I wouldn't be too worried about h4x0rz sniffing the form itself, since they can get the exact same doc from the server, so there is no reason to increase webserver CPU load by encrypting it. View source, and look for the tag if you don't believe me.

 
Ank666

October 26, 2000, 11:18 PM

Thanks Benjamin and ChaosWizard for clearing that up. I really do apologize, I guess I got the names mixed up. Sorry once again.

 
a_j_harvey

October 27, 2000, 12:15 AM

Someone did a 3d tetris for VE golden oldies a few years back.

It was fun and very playable (after a bit of a learning curve).

Can't remember what its called, but it is *heaps* better than the wireframe ones.

Got it on my hd if anyone's interested

 
Sdw

October 27, 2000, 02:58 AM

Oh yeah, I remember that 3D-tetris from the VE-contest. Can't remember what it was called either, but it was a great game.

You had a cube, which you could rotate, and then the pieces stuck to the sides of the cube.. or something like that... :)

Btw. was it Glide-only? Otherwise it would be cool to dig it up and give it a try again..

 
Cybok^Guideline

October 27, 2000, 04:57 AM

You should all try Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine, for the Sega16bit, I personnaly find this the best 'tetris-clone' ever, althoough it's more like Collums. I have been playing this game for I believe 9years now, and I'm still not bored with it.

 
Chaoswizard

October 27, 2000, 09:32 AM

Thanks Kijiki, I saw the form is sent encrypted just after I post my message. My apologies; I still think though that the page should be encrypted, as customers look for the lock symbol in their browsers and few have the patience to look into the source. Besides, it's a clumsy procedure to display the certificate information as it's done now.

Chaoswizard

 
bit64

October 27, 2000, 10:20 AM

Thanks Richard for clearing that up in a flammatory manner=)
Nice to see there are people with manners here.

 
NatureMan

October 27, 2000, 10:31 AM

there was a game called Welltris, which was a top down view of 4 walls and a floor in which the blocks crawled down the walls and fill the floor ( stopping @ (A) if they meet other blocks, or (B)if they reach the edge of the floor oposite the wall they came down

the neat part was that you could split the shapes on the corners thus filling the floor in places that would otherwise be difficult

you cleared lines by filling rows, one wall to the other

at the beginning of new levels the first piece would be this huge one oddly shaped that you would have to try to fit, was really hard once it got fast cause you wouldn't have time to flip it AND think at the same time :)

I liked it much better than tetris

 
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