Not logged in, Join Here! or Log In Below:  
 
News Articles Search    
 

 Home / 3D Theory & Graphics / Any info on the physics used in racing games? Account Manager
 
Archive Notice: This thread is old and no longer active. It is here for reference purposes. This thread was created on an older version of the flipcode forums, before the site closed in 2005. Please keep that in mind as you view this thread, as many of the topics and opinions may be outdated.
 
Craig

July 18, 1999, 01:14 PM

Please does anyone know where I can get info(Tutorials/docs/src) to the physics used in
top view car games, eg. Micromachines, Supercars(old Amiga game), etc.

 
Kurt Miller

July 18, 1999, 02:24 PM



Craig wrote:
>>Please does anyone know where I can get info(Tutorials/docs/src) to the physics used in
>>top view car games, eg. Micromachines, Supercars(old Amiga game), etc.

You might want to try:

The Physics of Racing Series

I don't know how much that'll help for a top-view car game (ie, I'm not sure how
realistic the physics in those games are), but its a good series anyway.


-kurt

 
Craig

July 18, 1999, 02:56 PM

Thanks Kurt.

I have this series in Postscript format but don't have a Postscript viewer (any ideas where I can get a good one), well thanks again as it is what I was looking for.

 
Kurt Miller

July 18, 1999, 03:10 PM



Craig wrote:
>>I have this series in Postscript format but don't have a Postscript
>>viewer (any ideas where I can get a good one)

Do a search for GhostScript and GSView. Both (they're used together)
are available from various internet sites.

Of course you could just read/save the html versions instead ;]

-kurt

 
Craig

July 19, 1999, 08:36 PM

Thanks. Found them. They're a bit big aren't they!

You wouldn't happen to know where I can get info/src on the
physics of snooker/pool games - where the balls bounce of each
other.

Thanks.

 
Kurt Miller

July 19, 1999, 10:47 PM



Craig wrote:
>>You wouldn't happen to know where I can get info/src on the
>>physics of snooker/pool games - where the balls bounce of each
>>other.

Hugo Elias' page has a document on snooker balls which explains the basic math:
http://freespace.virgin.net/hugo.elias/

The link does work, but you might have to try it several times.

-kurt

 
Craig

July 21, 1999, 07:57 PM

Very useful site.

Thanks, again!

 
SKWiD

July 28, 1999, 02:09 PM

Simple object mechanics can best be described with vectors. Each object should have a velocity, acceleration, angular_velocity and angular_acceleration. A car's movement would be based on these 4 vectors. Each frame the the velocity vectors are added with the acceleration vectors.

Collisions are handled by just adding impact forces to the car. All forces that are acted on the car go through a process that calculates the torque acted upon the object by doing a simple cross product of the force with the direction vector from the center of mass of the car to the impact.

All vectors go through the same process. All you have to do is find out what forces you want to put in. The essentials for cars would probably be:
car weight (gravity)
wheel forces (in the direction of the normal to the plane they are on)
engine forces
brake forces
impact forces
frictional forces

hell you could even put in wind resistance based on car frontal surface area.

Whatever you do, keep the framework simple so that it is flexible enough to add features to it later. You will always come up with something new to add. Don't use different frameworks for different forces.

That is about all I can say from my experience with Quake Rally II.

Good Luck,
/SKWiD

 
SKWiD

July 28, 1999, 02:10 PM

Simple object mechanics can best be described with vectors. Each object should have a velocity, acceleration, angular_velocity and angular_acceleration. A car's movement would be based on these 4 vectors. Each frame the the velocity vectors are added with the acceleration vectors.

Collisions are handled by just adding impact forces to the car. All forces that are acted on the car go through a process that calculates the torque acted upon the object by doing a simple cross product of the force with the direction vector from the center of mass of the car to the impact.

All vectors go through the same process. All you have to do is find out what forces you want to put in. The essentials for cars would probably be:
car weight (gravity)
wheel forces (in the direction of the normal to the plane they are on)
engine forces
brake forces
impact forces
frictional forces

hell you could even put in wind resistance based on car frontal surface area.

Whatever you do, keep the framework simple so that it is flexible enough to add features to it later. You will always come up with something new to add. Don't use different frameworks for different forces.

That is about all I can say from my experience with Quake Rally II.

Good Luck,
/SKWiD

 
This thread contains 9 messages.
 
 
Hosting by Solid Eight Studios, maker of PhotoTangler Collage Maker.