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Archive Notice: This thread is old and no longer active. It is here for reference purposes. This thread was created on an older version of the flipcode forums, before the site closed in 2005. Please keep that in mind as you view this thread, as many of the topics and opinions may be outdated.
 
Sp0rtyt

February 15, 2005, 03:24 AM

Is it even possible? I find that most people are not serious at all once the intro is over and the real work begins. Everyone seems to have their own agenda. People are hard to contact and maybe answer once or twice a week.

 
Corre

February 15, 2005, 04:42 AM

I would say: get to know people first (and know them really well), and team up with them when you know them. It is hard enough to do internet work with people you know, but it is impossible with people you don't know well.

 
Sam Jew

February 15, 2005, 06:07 AM

The Prisoner's Dilemma: Online

 
Digit

February 15, 2005, 07:36 AM

A good way to handle it, which is some advice I got from another team, is to make as much of the project as possible without art or any of the 'fun' stuff. Handle all this towards the end of the development. You will obviously need some test areas, animations, sound and so on, but there is no reason to do it all before the code is actually finished. ;)

Digit

 
Sam Jew

February 15, 2005, 08:43 AM

That's the way we did it with our team as well and at this stage I can say it worked out very well.

Having a stable, extensible foundation is more valuable than every other consideration put together.

However, you must prepare yourself for a long and lonely first few years when people look at your work and quickly dismiss it, not paying a second glance, because they see no eye candy.

 
Sam Jew

February 16, 2005, 05:12 AM

Unless of course, you're recruiting an artist and tell them it's their job to make the game look pretty.

 
Digit

February 16, 2005, 05:24 AM

True. But even cheap art, for me at least, appears to be very expensive. :(

Digit

 
strategy

March 02, 2005, 06:16 AM

Digit wrote: A good way to handle it, which is some advice I got from another team, is to make as much of the project as possible without art or any of the 'fun' stuff. Handle all this towards the end of the development.


Very sound advice. And as said - be prepared for the long lonely years. Or best of all - don't make a game that requires long lonely years; cut down your dream until it is something that can be done in 12-18 months at the most (which in practice often means you should try for something that you THINK will only take 6 months).

An additional tip is to prepare a "introduction" package for each type of "helper" you would like to have on the project. I.e., have an "art package" (samples of how you'd like the art to look + art specification + an introductory task), a "sound package" (as above with sound), as well as some well-defined but non-essential coding tasks (tasks that are not urgent for you to code). This will allow you to deal with interested people who profess an intention to join the project quickly and without wasting a lot of time; because 95% of the people you'll get in contact with won't pass the hurdle from talking about doing something to actually getting something done.

 
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