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Archive Notice: This thread is old and no longer active. It is here for reference purposes. This thread was created on an older version of the flipcode forums, before the site closed in 2005. Please keep that in mind as you view this thread, as many of the topics and opinions may be outdated.
 
Jaap Suter

March 23, 1999, 06:55 AM

Hiya,

Recently i read about an interesting rasterization technique and i just thought about
sharing it with you people cause I would like to hear what you think about this.
I did not think up this by myself, i just read about it.

I goes like this:

Do not update the entire screen every single frame, but instead keep up your frame rate three
times as high and update in a random fashion only one third of the screen. This would allow for
three times higher frame rates without noticable screen jagginess. The only thing that happens
is when going really fast is that the screen gets blurry. But think of it like a sort of
motion blur. I've seen pictures of this technique and it looked pretty cool!!!

There is one problem however. Current rasterization do nothing with this method and cannot do
anything with this method. Also to randomly plot pixels on the screen that would be something
completely new.

I guess it is nothing seriously because hardware wont support this shit. That's why i
sometimes long back to the good old software-engine times when you could indeed pull this
kind off tricks.

Anyways

i was bored (school sucks) so i just wanted to share this with you.

See ya!

Jaap Suter

 
Jeroen

March 25, 1999, 02:48 PM



Jaap Suter wrote:
>>Hiya,
>>
>>Recently i read about an interesting rasterization technique and i just thought about
>>sharing it with you people cause I would like to hear what you think about this.
>>I did not think up this by myself, i just read about it.
>>
>>I goes like this:

...Description of algorithm clipped by Jeroen... ;)

Hmm, I don't know. This algorithm places an extreme emphasis on the "PutPixel" part. What about
the rest of the processing (Tranform to screen-space, clipping, shading etc?). You can't do
that for one third polygon :). Unless you process only one third of the polygons, and go all
the way for the poly's which you do process. But I don't think this would look good.

Jeroen

 
Harmless

May 02, 1999, 02:46 PM

Jeroen wrote:
>>Jaap Suter wrote:
>>>>Hiya,
>>>>Recently i read about an interesting rasterization technique and i just thought about
>>>>sharing it with you people cause I would like to hear what you think about this.
>>>>I did not think up this by myself, i just read about it.
>>>>I goes like this:
>>...Description of algorithm clipped by Jeroen... ;)
>>Hmm, I don't know. This algorithm places an extreme emphasis on the "PutPixel" part. What about
>>the rest of the processing (Tranform to screen-space, clipping, shading etc?). You can't do
>>that for one third polygon :). Unless you process only one third of the polygons, and go all
>>the way for the poly's which you do process. But I don't think this would look good.
>>
>>Jeroen

I did something very similar when I was experimenting with integrated light through fog through numerical methods. In a static scene you can precalculate a lot, but you can't let your frame rate die if too much of the scene changes, so this method (splotch updating) helps immensely. For raytracing based demos, this method is popular. An example is the bad mojo demo that is (or at least was) distributed as part of the Prometheus True Color source code on http://www.gaffer.org. It lends itself a sort of surreal quality that I always thought would make a very interesting game. Thing is you don't want to update a single pixel, you want to update a small splotch around the pixel to make this method worth doing. Look for
Transgression 2 by MFX on http://www.hornet.org for a good example of this being used in a demo.

-Harmless

 
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